Palm Print Megan

My palm print Megan dress is finished!

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The fabric is by Sevenberry and I’m in love with it. It’s light, but has some structure. It holds a crease when you want it to, but doesn’t crease through wear. It’s great!

palm-megan-back

I really like this dress. I put most of it together very quickly without much thought, which was rewarding after how long my first Megan took me. But when I was about to put the sleeves on my husband commented that it actually looked really good without sleeves. So I thought I’d have a go at making bias tape and using it as a facing. It took me a whole day to figure it out, but I got there in the end – one new dress, two new skills. And he was right! The Megan is brilliant without sleeves.

palm-megan-sleeve

The one thing in this pattern that I’m still unsure about is the length of the dart tucks on the front of the bodice. One of my original fit adjustments was to lengthen the bodice, but I didn’t know what to do with the dart tucks so I left them as they were. I think I need to lengthen them by the same amount so that they lie flat.

palm-megan-side

See how that dart tuck billows out just a touch at the bust? I think the bodice fit is pretty good apart from that. I can’t easily get that part of the bodice under the machine now it’s been fixed to the skirt, so I tried to hand sew it flat – turns out I still don’t have any patience for hand sewing. Might try slip stitching it later. I don’t think it’s a big deal though, I’ll just mark the dart longer on my pattern piece and bear it in mind next time.

palm-megan-front

I’ve done quite a few Tilly patterns in a row now, and it’s time for me to branch out. I finished a Bettine dress yesterday and I’ll be posting about that soon, but I’ve ordered some Colette and Sewaholic patterns to get a bit more variety in my me-made wardrobe.

Speaking of which, I signed up to Me-Made May! I’ve pledged to wear at least two pieces that I’ve made myself each week in the month of May. Looking forward to it!

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Anchor Mimi Blouse

Look, it’s my first blouse! I made the Mimi blouse from Love at First Stitch.
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I made no alterations to this one as I made it immediately after making my alteration-ridden Megan dress (the one with the six bodice muslins) and I just wanted to get my teeth stuck straight into the sewing. I think the finished piece fits me alright – but then it’s a loose fitting garment with no darts or anything, so there wasn’t much risk there.
anchor-mimi-buttons-2
I bought the fabric at the People’s Park Food Centre in Chinatown, which is amazing by the way. Fabric stores as far as the eye can see – and cheap too!
This is a cotton, but beyond that I couldn’t tell you much about it. I thought it was a lawn when I bought it, but it isn’t especially drapey, so I suspect it’s more of a poplin. Anyone got any tips on how to identify different types of cotton?
Unfortunately the pattern calls for drapiness, so the finished blouse is a bit stiffer than I would like. It’s wearable, but I’m not really all that sure about the way it hangs at the back when it’s tucked in:
anchor-mimi-tucked-side.jpg
anchor-mimi-tucked-back.jpg
That’s not as much of a problem when its untucked -but that’s not really my style. I tend towards an hourglass silhouette, so I’d typically tuck in a loose fitting blouse at the waist. We’ll have to see how often I reach for this one in my wardrobe.
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anchor-mimi-untucked-back.jpg
I did have a couple of other issues making it. I must have sewn the yoke interfacing on a little wonky, because the corner above the top button really wants to stick out, and no amount of pressing will subdue it. I had a go at restitching it without much success, so in the end I whacked a hidden hook-and-eye in there. Bit of a duct tape solution, but it did the trick…
anchor-mimi-hook-eye
The other issue was really just foolishness on my part. Put the buttons on the wrong side, didn’t I? Totally didn’t think that through. At least I know I’ll never make that mistake again. It feels very weird buttoning up a blouse this way round!
anchor-mimi-buttons-1
All in all, a successful make, but I’m not sure how much I will end up wearing it. I’ve just picked up some drapey rayon to make up another version and see if I can make this pattern work for me.
anchor-mimi-sleeve-detail

Making Another Megan

Firstly, a brief announcement: my blog has a new name! Cotton on Cotton is now Cotton Noodle. I changed it because wanted something that wasn’t so close to the name of an established brand. Picking a name is hard, and it’s even harder the second time around as you have something to compare it to. The new name quietly alludes to the fact that the blog was born in Singapore. Or maybe I was just hungry.
Anyway, back on topic… Here’s my work-in-progress:

palm-megan-in-progress.jpg

After putting all that effort into fitting the Megan pattern, I’ve kicked off another version. This fabric is a Sevenberry cotton that I managed to find in the chaos of Singapore’s Mustafa Centre. I like that the palm print is quite busy, while the monochrome stops it from being loud. This is going to be another work dress so I want it to be relatively subdued.

I lowered the neckline a touch, giving it a soft V-shape. I’m also considering keeping it sleeveless. Otherwise, I’ve kept the same alterations as last time.

I’m having loads of fun making this one. I think as I’m getting better at sewing, and have to stop and refer to instructions less and less, I am getting more of that rush of joy that comes from creating something with my own hands. It’s this feeling that makes me love being a maker. I’ve been a knitter for a few years, so it’s nothing new to me – but I am enjoying how sewing brings this sense of gratification and pride more often, as garments are faster to finish. Yup, I think I really like sewing.

Anchor Buttons

I discovered self cover buttons!

anchor-buttons

I’ve just finished off a Mimi blouse (another pattern from Love at First Stitch) and just have to share how cute my buttons are!

I’d never made self cover buttons before, so when I made these I was really giddy at how perfectly they came out. Check out how they’re the perfect size for an anchor to fit on!

And you know what? It’s a total coincidence. Ha! I didn’t think about it at all, I just picked out a fabric I liked (yay anchors) and bought 1/2″ buttons because the pattern told me to. I was literally squealing with joy when the two came together so nicely!

Photos of my Mimi coming up soon. What shall I make next?

I made a Megan dress!

Behold… I made a Megan dress!

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A few weeks ago I picked up a copy of Love At First Stitch by Tilly Walnes, from the Kinokuniya at Ngee Ann City. (If you’re in Singapore, I really recommend the sewing book section there – there are a lot of books that have paper patterns included, including those from bloggers like Tilly, Collete Patterns and Gertie. I got a little over excited in the shop!)

I’d read the reviews for Love At First Stitch so I was pretty hyped for the book. And it totally lived up to expectation! It’s a gorgeous book, very beautifully put together – and Tilly has a lovely conversational way of writing which makes you feel like you’ve known her for years.

 

megan-book
Shamelessly copying one of Tilly’s poses from the book

 

But I’ve gotta say, I found the Megan dress a real challenge. Nothing to do with the pattern or instructions – but just getting the bodice to fit. The pattern is drafted for a B-cup, but I am a C/D, so I knew I was going to need a full bust adjustment. But I wasn’t expecting that I would end up making six muslins of the bodice…

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The five discarded bodice pieces that didn’t make the final muslin
And on the plus side, I am now an expert at sewing darts after having done about 30 of them as part of this muslin saga!

In the end, I made a 1.5″ full bust adjustment, lengthened the bodice by 1/5″, and took 2″ out of the back neckline. I also shortened the hem by 2″.

And now it’s all finished! The fabric is a cotton poplin I bought at Spotlight.

megan-full

I’m really proud of it. I’ve made it for work to force myself to wear the stuff I make on normal days rather than saving it for special occasions.
megan-back-full
There are a few errors in it, but I’m okay with that (I’m telling myself). I’m not too crazy about the dart tucks around the bodice as they don’t seem to lie properly, and the zip is a bit stiff. But it’s all cool, because I made a dress!
megan-back

Two Hollyburn Skirts

In my first month of sewing I’ve made two Hollyburn skirts. The sewalong at Lavender Lane helped enormously through the process.

I printed out the PDF pattern, and even just taping that together was a real learning curve for a newbie like me! Somehow I ended up with wonky grainline markings in the pattern – but I think I got away with it.

I made this green version first (my first ever garment!):

top-pop-hollyburn

I was pretty pleased with myself. Within a few days I had turned a length of fabric into a wearable item of clothing!

Just don’t look on the inside… The tension on the zig-zag seam finish is off so they’re all scrunched up. And the waistband interfacing is exposed in places! Some of the seams are wonky, too – I could not get that cheap polycotton to hold a pressed fold for more than a few minutes.

All in all though, this skirt is the end product of a serious learning experience. I had a lot of fun making it, even the frustrating bits along the way like redoing the zipper four times. (Now I understand why basting is always recommended.)

Then I made this version for my birthday, and all my feelings of pride about the green skirt were blown out of the water:

vintage-poplin-hollyburn

I’m really happy with this one! I took all my learnings from the first version, and applied them fastidiously and painstakingly. And isn’t that fabric gorgeous? I picked it up at Spotlight.

I didn’t match up the print on the seams, but other than that I was possibly a bit too perfectionist. This afternoon I read in Love At First Stitch that if you mess up a couple of stitches, you don’t actually have to redo the whole seam. I’ll get through my future projects a lot faster with that bit of knowledge!

I wore the floral skirt out on my birthday – my husband treated me to dinner at Lime House, which was great fun. I loved the jerk chicken carpaccio (bold but delicate) and the macaroni pie (wholesome and comforting). I ate a huge amount – by the end of the night I was grateful for the ease in the skirt’s waistband!

I see myself making many more Hollyburn skirts – they are exactly my style, and so easy to wear.

My First Project! Pillowcases!

I started out on my sewing journey in the typical way: I made a pillowcase!

It actually happened at the perfect time – my husband and I wanted to get new bedding for the new year, but we couldn’t find pillowcases to match our king-size pillows anywhere in Singapore. When I realised I could make pillowcases easily with my new sewing machine, it was like it was fated to happen! My beginner’s project immediately turned into a mission – I had to make 2 sets of 4 king-size pillowcases to replace our old ones. 

So I trotted down to Spotlight to find some fabric. I knew it would be a learning curve picking out fabric for the first time – but goodness me, it took ages. I was probably in there for an hour, poring over all the different types of cotton and trying to find a good balance between the feel, the colour, the pattern and the price. I ended up choosing bright green cotton poplin in polkadots and stripes. Bright colours lift my spirits, and I’m on a real green kick right now!

I made my very first pillowcase following the envelope closure pillowcase tutorial over at Make It & Love It. I finished the seams and pressed it neatly, and then went to put it on my pillow feeling super proud of myself… then I realised I’d made the darn thing far too big! Turns out American king-size pillows are bigger than UK ones. First important lesson learned – double check your measurements!

(Well, maybe the first important lesson I learned the hard way was to lower the presser foot before sewing. I had quite a panic after getting about a foot of thread tangled up in the feed dogs.)

So. I ripped out all the seams from my oversized pillowcase, did some measuring and some maths, and started over. This time it fit perfectly! I made four:

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I also modified the approach so that each pillow is made with two pieces of fabric rather than one. I found it hard to manipulate such huge pieces of fabric. 

The final numbers I ended up with to fit a UK king-size pillow are:

  • Front piece – 20.5″ x 34.5″
  • Back piece – 20.5″ x 42.5″

This gives finished dimensions of 19.5″ x 33″. I first hem one short edge on each piece by folding it up twice by 0.5″ and then use 0.5″ seam allowances.

A couple of weeks ago I made a second set. They’re in the wash right now so I’ll have to share the pictures later!